The fingerboard has developed a hump on the subject early '50s ES-140 archtop. After discussing with the owner of the instrument, we decided to remove the frets and sand down the hump. To maintain the originality of the instrument, I will try and use the existing fretwire, which are still in very good condition.

The frets are carefully removed with minimal chipping. You can see the very obvious rise in the tongue of the fingerboard.
The frets are carefully removed with minimal chipping. You can see the very obvious rise in the tongue of the fingerboard.
The fingerboard is fretted without any incident.

The guitar is strung after some light dressing and she plays a lot better now.

After tweaking the intonation, I usually use some self-adhesive clear Mylar to mark out the bridge location on an Archtop guitar. This way, the player is able to locate the correct placement for accurate intonation. As you can see, when properly intonated, the bridge is way off from the original footprint.
The guitar is set up and all ready to go. Fans of the local indie music scene may recognize this guitar. The owner is none other than Leslie Low formerly of "The Humpback Oak" and now "The Observatory".